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in the world. all of the governments. >> held for one year, a u.s. hiker leaves iran and reveals a message to iran's president on her way out. and then doctors helpless and drugs not working. a new super bug threat growing in the united states. it's origin, and the states that are getting hit. hello, everyone. i'm richard lui in for chris jansing at nbc headquarters. we have two breaking stories i want to share with you first. take you to tennessee where an explosion there at a plant that makes flairs for the military. that is toone in tennessee. it's about 75 miles due east of memphis, if you're familiar with that area. this is in the southwest part of the state. it's unclear, according to the latest information that we've got in terms of how many people have been hurt. we have been listening to local affiliate. it's reporting multiple ambulances and helicopters were sent to the scene. we hope to get the pictures for you very soon. stay with us. we'll monitor that and get you the latest information. we're also watching this breaking story from amsterdam. we go to where a u.s. pilot was ar
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c-, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
. we think the government no longer reflects the will of the american people. nobody is listening us to. 68% of voters say most members of congress don't care what their constituents think that's actualing this movement. >> sean: interesting if you look at nevada or rand paul in kentucky, recently in alaska, christine o'donnell may win tomorrow. the establishment has been out threw attack her and attacking her in this vicious way. conservatives are angry. most conservatives i know, they don't mind a fair and open debate on the issues. mike castle did vote for cap and tax, he did vote for tarp. christine o'donnell said i wouldn't have voted that way. if they lose again tomorrow, what does that say for the republicans, scott? >> well, what it says is the republicans -- republican establishment is going to be in full retreat am i don't know what is going to happen tomorrow. we haven't polled that race. the fact that it is competitive is because of the energy that is coming from the tea party side. republican establishment saying wait a minute, we'll probably win the election in the fall in
city bombing was about half a ton of explosions. nuclear weapons, the unit used is thousands of tons. it takes about 25 truck loads, semitrucks. there have been megaton weapons as well. think about something completely different. do not think in terms of just another explosion. the original five nuclear club was formed. it become clear they were the ones that would control the intent around the world. what if that hadn't happened or suppose we didn't understand all the things we did about notify indication. we maloufed it was possible to make explosions. that took a lost effort to do. what if it had not happened? >> it is a great sport for people not involved in relay history. if discovery hadn't been made, what would the world have been capable of doing without that? my wife hates it because i watch the history channel. there were eight wars by the time i was in middle school. eight strategic wars and vietnam for us. we new world war i left about 20 million people dead. without nuclear weapons, what is the world tapeable of doing in terms of conventional arment. think about world wa
nuclear arms reduction treaty. >> with the house and senate back in session, follow congress using the c-span 2 libraries -- using the c-span video library. it is a great resource for anyone who uses the library. >> the imam leading the effort to build a summit center near ground zero says he is surprised by the controversy surrounding the plan. from the scalp -- from the council on foreign plans in new york city, this is one hour. >> good morning. people, please take your seats. welcome to the council on foreign relations. my name is richard hoss and i am the president of this organization. today, as you all know, we are hosting feisal abdul rauf, who is the founder and ceo for the american society for muslim advancement. he is also the imam, which i expect you all know, for the mosque here in new york city. that is, however, only part of who we is. he is the founder and chair of the cordova initiative dedicated to building bridges between the muslim and non-muslim world. he is also essential to plans for the building to the new islamic community center to be built adjacent to ground ze
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
to for the good of all of us. but they know coming out and banning things like french fries not really going to go over well. have progressives ever done that before? >> oh, yes, thank you for asking. yes, they have it's a good thing we have our little time chart because if you know history. you're going to be able to remember let's see 1920, it's the 18th amendment. what is that? that's prohibition, a lot of alcoholics, you know, a lot of alcoholics, it's best for society if we say just say no to booze. well, that worked out well. by the way, one of my favorite movies, untouchables, great. oh, that had something to do with this. that's right, from 1920 to 1933, we had prohibition, no booze. >> yeah, didn't work out well, remember sean connery, you got to choose. what are you prepared to? remember that, yeah, didn't work out well. we can't just ban things, we've learned from history, we have a new approach. now, we don't ban, no, no, we nudge. we can just nudge people. what is a nudge? oh, look at this book, it's nudge. see what nudge is, instead of banning it, you'll have to special order french
word. >> one we should all use today. >> like turning starbucks products into gold. >> or sand. >> i think it is. another great story from the west coast we will be talking about in a little bit. bill clinton, somehow managing to get right smack-dab in the middle of that california gubernatorial campaign. he's not even trying. this guy, jerry brown and bill clinton, these guys just hate each other and impacting that race. >> here's my guess, although bill clinton is now in the middle of that race spiritually, my guess is physically, corporately, he may not be at jerry brown's side campaigning on his behalf before november 2nd. >> jerry brown, i forgot this, he refused to endorse bill clinton in 1992, after clinton had locked down the nomination. >> it's true. >> jerry brown, the first guy to bring up whitewater. jerry brown, a guy that bill clinton, just to set the back story, remember the '92 debate, where clinton gets read -- how dare you attack my wife? before we get to the news. >> it's primary day -- >> hold on. i got you guys some gifts, really quickly. >> oh. >> tuscaloosa. th
and the doubters. it george mitchell gave a good assessment after the first session of talks. >> all of us reaffirm our commitment to reaching a shared goal for the just, lasting, and lasting peace. >> -- proper peace. >> the issue that is sticking is the settlements. the palestinians are threatening to walk away unless there is no more settlements. the israelis say this is not possible. the prime minister is pinned in by a coalition pressing him not to give ground. how much progress is made on the issue has not emerged. the parties have sat together for two long sessions and will return to jerusalem for more talks tomorrow. so, no big announcements and the best anyone can hope for is that they are continuing. there will be many long hard days of communications and negotiation if this is to bear fruit. >> she has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year but today the u.s. female hiker was reported -- was released from iran. she and her companions were accused of spying. they insist that they got lost in iraq. according to her mother, she has been denied treatment for serious health pr
and put on planes to romania. >> today the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's atta
these days? we're keeping them honest with our democrat, paul begala. and michael moore joins us with the imam of the ground zero mosque speaking openly and leaving opened the possibility of moving it, he's raising money. he says he doesn't want it near ground zero he wants it at ground zero. >>> and questions about the gas explosion in california. what did the gas company know about the problem with the pipelines. and we have new incredible video. we begin keeping them honest with a political firestorm begun by newt gingrich, a once and perhaps future presidential candidate, calling the president in so many words, an alien, liar and conman who deceived americans into voting for him. he asked, what if president obama is so outside our comprehension, gingrich told reporters, that only if you understand kenyan anti-colonial behavior can you begin to piece together his actions? he goes on to say that during a chat session on friday, this is a person who is fundamentally out of touch with how the world works, who happened to have played a wonderful con as a result of which he is now
, is using new technology to maximise efficiency and help lift people out of poverty. >>reporter: michel bougma is a farmer in the village of tiibin in burkina faso. >>life is hard here. the soil is deteriorating due to the high heat and wind. and climate change is resulting in shorter season cycles. food shortages abound. >>bonkoungou: challenge in my village, this village and around this village is the poverty of the soil. so yield is decreasing, so we have to make everything we can to make some more productive and this is why we research to find solutions to make more productivity for our people. >>reporter: and that's what's happening at inera, the institute for agricultural and environmental research in burkina faso. >>it has access to agora, the research 4 life programme supported by the food & agriculture organization... allowing free online access to high-quality, timely and relevant scientific journals, books and databases. >>traore: because of globalization, africa cannot be away from this technology knowledge sharing. so to have access to agora is a good thing for us and also
of this story. >>> over to the world of business. ines joins us now. >> the yen's appreciation against the dollar continues on the tokyo foreign exchange. the yen dipped tuesday morning. the greenback is changing hands at 83.46-47, while the euro is at 107.40. the dollar yet 43 yen earlier. that came as momentum carried over from earlier markets. many staying on the sidelines as japan's ruling democratic lawmakers prepare to vote for a new party leader later in the day. the result of the vote may accelerate the yen's rise. tokyo stocks moved within a narrow range on tuesday morning as investors waited to see whether the yen strengthens any further. the nikkei end the session at 9,300 on the dot, down 21 ticks. the broader base closing down 21 ticks. investors are shying away from active trading as they wait for results from the democratic election. here's a look at the long-term interesthe ten-year japanese government bond. the hang seng is up 0.3%. the shanghai up 0.6%. and the sse composite up 0.4%. >>> the euro zone's economy is predicted to grow at a rate of 1.7% this year, revise
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)